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20130801
20130831
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COM 8
CNBC 3
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MSNBC 1
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
Comedy Central
Aug 15, 2013 1:00am PDT
and magical ♪ ♪ the happy train's on track ♪ because america is back ♪ yeah! ♪ woo hoo! come on! ♪ - wait, what? [all cheering] - ♪ america is back ♪ america is back - wait, according to that scale, i still have a small wiener! - ♪ america is back - i'm still [bleep] angry! - ♪ back and we're back and we're back ♪ ♪ we're so back, we're so back ♪ ♪ back back back back back ♪ captioning sponsored by comedy central from comedy central's world news headquarters in new york, this is the daily show with jon stewart. [ cheers and applause ] >> john: welcome to the daily show. [ cheers and applause ] my name is john oliver. i am still sitting in for jon stewart who has been spending the entire summer at training camp with the new york giants. apparently he's extremely happy and in almost constant pain. our guest tonight tv legend and host of the new show crowd goes wild on fox 1 regis philbin is here. [ cheers and applause ] oh, yes, indeed. we start tonight with the news media. now, personally i get all my news from jon stewart and the daily show. which is why i have absolutel
Current
Aug 6, 2013 5:00pm PDT
to see how far our labor stand has fallen behind other countries. i want america to be number one, not number one in foreign countries occupied or number one in number of people incarcerated. i want america to be number one in wages. i want america to be number one in benefits. i want america to be number one in healthcare. in australia, they have a $16 an hour minimum wage. in germany, people routinely, as a matter of law get up to six weeks off each year and they get 44 days of paid sick leave. germany is not impoverished by that. they're strengthened. we need to make the same sort of steps here in america to improve the working conditions of the people who work. >> john: i think germany providing their version of medicare for everyone who makes under $100,000 has something to do with that of course. >> germany has had universal healthcare for a century. we're still arguing about it here in the united states. >> john: 100 years after teddy roosevelt ran for it on the progressive ticket. >> that's right. >> john: pushback is the only thing we're getting from our republican friend
CSPAN
Aug 12, 2013 2:00pm EDT
told this reporter the great thing about america is there's all these jobs. that's not something americans think, like there's all these jobs. the other thing on these immigrants said was, the other great thing about america is that if you work hard you can get ahead in this country. >> i was here in texas a month or two ago, and it was a small business, just one little taxi come and the driver was an immigrant. i asked him about his experience when he came to america. he said when i arrived it was like i was woken up and i had these opportunities. >> i think it's kind of ambitious drive that is unique to immigrants. let's face it, there's -- 99% of the people in the world never move from where the girl. watauga but the 1% of people are ambitious enough and courageous enough to leave your homeland is a very courageous thing to do. so this is as an economist, i just think this is one of the kind of innate advantages of having immigration. number one, they are preselected for kind of economic success. and number two, this gets back to my point about china, let's face it, the bigges
Comedy Central
Aug 14, 2013 11:00pm PDT
is going to be able to sell cricket to america. >> you never heard of gorgey thompson. >> john: i do. she knows you and i've been asking her about you. >> john: whoa! after the show we'll talk. john: she's fantastic. she was on the news for years. >> ten years. john: good luck selling cricket. >> do you play cricket. john: you know what? everything in britain is class based. so cricket is for posh people. >> really? john: that's not for the likes of me. i know i sound like it. >> what sport did you play as a kid growing up. >> john: soccer. religiously. >> it's a big deal. it's getting bigger and bigger in america. >> john: i want to be a soccer player more than anything else. this was very much plan-b. >> how in the world did this happen? you wanted to play soccer and here you are. >> john: it was a complete lack of physical ability. and that's all. >> you couldn't kick the ball. john: are you a frustrated athlete as well? >> i used to play in bronx park. john: play what? baseball. john: classic. a little football. yeah, sure. >> john: you're a yankee fan. yes, i am. (a few people in the
MSNBC
Aug 6, 2013 9:00am PDT
history, talking about the pentagon papers, the water gate scandal, more recently their top secret america piece -- series, the walter reed medical hospital series that won him the pulitzer. there's the question of like is there going to be an investment -- and is there an investment in had this digital age in terms of that kind of reporting, that kind of granularity, that kind of fact finding and that commitment to stories that may not get a lot of click-throughs at the beginning or ever but matter in terms of information and awareness. >> well, i think the answer is both yes and i hope so, and it has to be. a couple things. a lot of this is due -- a lot of the kinds of journalism that you are talking about is due to the commitment of the families and the people who own these institutions. as john said, the grahams. i was lucky to have worked for the grahams because "newsweek" where i worked for many years is owned by "the washington post" company. i had a lot of of company with him. the grahams were an inspiration. before that i worked in louisville for the bingham family that owned "the
CSPAN
Aug 12, 2013 8:00am EDT
to this year's printer's row literary festival to hear about "the cooked seed." then on to bookexpo be america in new york city city with erica jong who talks about "fear of flying." and we finish with author and radio talk show host larry elder at the los angeles times festival of books as he discusses his memoir about his troubled relationship with his father in "dear father, dear son." booktv in prime time all this week on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: well, with the announcement this week that "the washington post" has been sold to jeff bethos, we thought we'd take this opportunity to look at changes in the newspaper industry and the potential future of the news industry in general. we have two guests joining us this week. first, we want to introduce you to alan mutter. he is in san francisco, and he is a newspaper consultant, he's a lecturer as well at the university of california berkeley on media economics, and he has served as a newspaper editor, a cable tv executive and a tech
CSPAN
Aug 11, 2013 7:00am EDT
or bad. yes, the long-term concern is there. if the papers go away america will be in very serious trouble because when you get down to it the television reporters are , what that one guy said, they are lap poodles. it is basically nothing more than lap pools for house members here in phoenix. you just do not know what is going on in washington from the electronic media at all. for the callou this morning. on that subject that you talked about on the future of newspapers and specifically what might happen with "the washington post," and this bezos -- by jeff might've contributed to part the sale. here's a bit of what he said. [video clip] was latemily was in -- in adopting a payroll product, which most of the major market has already started doing. the fact that they could've started that years ago, the way the financial times or the wall street journal had done years ago, i think maybe that certainly hastens their financial difficulties, that they were so late to doing a pay wall. politico is a block in bc. they have a high tier subscription product, which seems to be doing very w
CNN
Aug 11, 2013 8:00am PDT
america and the reason the company is one of the big success stories out of the 1990s is that jeff has a philosophy of making bets that are going to pay off over decades. he is not worried about this quarter's earnings, this year's earnings, he's not worried about making a profit to impress wall street this year. and the company is also mocked and criticized for that but only by short-term people who don't understand the value of taking those profits and reinvesting them and that's why amazon has been so successful. so looking at "the post," they are losing money now. my guess is he will be patient as long as he thinks "the post" is making very intelligent investments for the future. what happens to the newspaper, is he going to combine newspaper delivery with some of amazon's physical delivery that they're moving into now? maybe so. will he eliminate the paper? eventually, i would imagine so. will he work on the website and the distribution and building out the newsroom so the "washington post" is much deeper and broader? certainly possible. >> you mentioned similarities between digit
CBS
Aug 11, 2013 8:30am PDT
like "spying," "snooping." does anybody think general alexander wants to snoop on america? i think that demeans the whole political dialogue and that's why i wish the president would be more outgoing and defend the n.s.a. a lot more than he did. this has really bane sland or the thousand of good men and women who every day dedicate their thrives our country and particularly general alexander, who is as patriotic as anyone i have ever met in government or anywhere. and there is too much loose talk here. again, every time i hear snooping and spying, it just drives me crazy. dutch and i know what these men and women are doing and they're absolutely dedicated patriots. >> i just want to point out, peter and chairman roarnlings, we have a very bipartisan committee in the intelligence committee. we zfar left. we have far right. but we work together as a team because the stakes are too high. and that's a very important issue. peter, i thank you for being on with us today and i agree a lot of your points. >> schieffer: thanks to both of you. i'll be back in just a second. chronic plaque ps
MSNBC
Aug 10, 2013 7:00am PDT
of america, of giving asylum to edward snowden, the president absolutely cannot go to a bilateral conversation with vladimir putin. >> so there's always a little moment for me, when condi rice and president obama are on the same policy page that always makes me want to pause and say, let's talk about that. do you agree? >> absolutely. i think the reset was great. they got as much out of it as you could. they got the start treaty, the transit route to afghanistan through russia, but then, things started to kind of go sour around the time of libya. the russians felt duped. they had abstained from vetoing at the security council. they couldn't vote in favor of it, but they abstained and felt the u.s. did a lot more than they said they were going to do. on their watch, qaddafi was killed. and the ambassador was harassed for months on the ground, in a very unprofessional, very sort of, this is not what states do to each other. and it went on from there. syria was a major irritant. and what you heard from the white house during this period was like, look, if you guys don't want to talk,
CNN
Aug 11, 2013 12:00pm PDT
1% of his personal fortune. as our jim acosta reports, billionaires have gone shopping in america's "newsroom." >> reporter: watergate brought down a president. >> have to get something on paper. >> reporter: but it made a newspaper. a triumph not just for reporters bob woodward and carl bernstein but also for the family that owned the "washington post" led by its publisher, kathryn graham, now that leg gas sin the future of one of the most important newspaper rests in the hands of one billionaire, amazon founder, jeff bezos, a stunning $250 million deal that gives an all new meaning to the term -- >> just follow the money. >> reporter: the post now follows other major newspapers. "wall street journal" bought by conservative media titan robert murdoch and "boston globe" purchased by red sox owner john henry to be snatched up by the super wealthy and perhaps the "new york times" could land in the portfolio of libertarian billi billionaires, robert and charles cope. >> i think it's not exactly new. >> reporter: william hearst came from family that made its fortune mining. the classi
CNBC
Aug 8, 2013 4:00am EDT
. and deutsche telekom warning of a profit slowdown in 2013 and looking toward north america for growth. where are the opportunities for this particular sector. we'll talk about that at 11:50 central european time. hope you had your pens and pencils ready. you can find us on e-mail as usual, worldwide@cnbc.com. and you can as per usual find us on twitter. but, again, just coming back to one of the stories breaking on our wires, we're hearing that there has been a quake in western japan. no tsunami warning issued according to dow jones news wires quoting media and magnitude of 2.3 is the magnitude of this quake in western japan. again, no tsunami warning issued. >>> let's move on, though, because china's trading activity in july has given new hope that mainland growth is stabilizing. exports climbed by around 5%. imports surging almost 11%. both figures were a lot better than analysts estimates. the rebound comes as a surprise given china's lackluster trade performance in the past couple of months. that's after authorities clamped down on illegal cash transfers disguised as trade deals. joining
NBC
Aug 11, 2013 6:00am EDT
conversation with ashton kutcher. "on the money" begins right now. >>> this is america's number one financial news program. "on the money." now, maria bartiromo. >>> re's what's making news as we head into a new week "on the money." president obama took his economic show on the road this week pitching housing reform in phoenix. mr. obama called the winding down the fannie mae and freddie mac which hold most of the mortgages are in the united states. he called for a limited government role and increase in private lending in the housing market. >> for too long these companies were allowed to make huge profits buying mortgages knowing that if their best went bad, taxpayers would be left holding the bag. >> meanwhile the markets broke a three-day slide on thursday catching their breath and consolidating a bit. it was the longest losing streak in more than a month. the markets fell on friday. earnings season is winding down. disney beat analysts' expectations though its venues fell short. 21st century fox had its first earnings report since it split newscorp. the company beat expectations as did a
CSPAN
Aug 12, 2013 2:00pm EDT
when many of us deployed to central america on humanitarian missions -- all of the skill sets paid us benefits in the 90s and 2000. how do we want to have that dynamic training that will keep people in the guard? we are really pushing this hard right now. we have to have the opportunity to fill vacancies. whether it is a critical chart or a chart fall for two or three years. some of you remember the keep up program, where folks can get away from an employer. the family situation is right. they can go close to an active duty bill, especially to the joint world. to focushat we ought on. it starts with getting the active component, the reserve component, structured right for the future. -- he is heading to the marine forces commander reserve. commanding general of our larger organization. first marine general to command nato forces, general mills. >> as a new one on the panel i will say that i came to work with the reserve component with the greatest respect the cousin twice on the battlefield both in iraq and at -- in iraq and afghanistan. one of the biggest challenges is maintaining th
CNBC
Aug 6, 2013 7:00pm EDT
newspaper is no longer appropriate for america's households. if your two guests were correct, then "usa today" would be making a billion dollars a year. they're not. the newspaper industry is the issue, not the content. there are many newspapers that chase the so-called middle that you think the "washington post" is turning up its nose at. but none of them are making money. the structure is no longer appropriate for today's -- >> who's making money? just for the heck of it, who -- which left-wing operation turning up its nose at ordinary people is making money? >> politico is. >> who? >> i think politico is left of center and they're probably making money, larry, because they -- >> huffington post. >> -- don't have any of those overhead costs. and i think the "washington examiner witt which is right of center is making money. but the post is dying not because it doesn't have the technological advantages mike's referring to. it's because their very talented reporters -- i'm going to say dan balz is the best in the business, dan wilbers, rajiv chandrasakaran best in the business. but when
CNBC
Aug 15, 2013 6:00am EDT
by 3.4%. it was hit by natural catastrophes, bad weather essentially, in north america. but also in europe. net profit missing expectations for the second quarter, and companies also pretty cautious about its outlook. last but not least, i want to show you what is happening in the currency space. sterling dollar at a two-month high, sitting at 155.78. getting closer and closer to that 156 level. this is on the back of better -- much stronger than expected retail sales for the month of july. certainly benefitting from that heat wave we have been seeing in the uk. euro dollar pretty resilient at 132.82, back below the 133 level. and dollar yen seeing a little bit of softness at 98.07. this is because the finance minister in japan pretty much quashed hopes of that cut in the corporate tax rate and this is what the markets had been hoping for. so we are seeing some yen strength. and on the back of that, we are seeing declines, pretty big ones, actually, in the nikkei 225. back over to you guys. >> thanks very much, carolin. becky, are you still looking? >> looking for some of these.
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)